SEA SICK SURF

SUMMER BOARD GUIDE

Part 1

Welcome dear surfer.

So, why browse this guide? 

Obviously because we want you to buy shit.

But more importantly, we want you to buy the right shit.

Right for you, that is.

Enjoy.

HUGE BUMMER. SUMMER'S HERE.

It's not that we hate summer. Really, we don't.

But with summer comes summer surf. With lots of small waves. And small waves suck ass.

Believe us Dutchmen, we know. Like, 'know' know.

Small waves are actually harder to surf well and thus require some super special surf craft to genuinely have fun on.

That's where this guide comes in.

We've lined up the best 'summer' board designs for you, to get you into and play around on top of as much fun summer slop as you can imagine. To make things a little easier, we've also grouped them according to body type and skill level/style. 'Cause as you might already know... all us humans were really not 'created equal'. No sir.

The first Part of this Guide will focus accordingly on all you eager beavers that just recently took up surfing or might have been bobbing around your local break now for a few years.*

 

* PS: More experienced ripperbrah? Stay sharp, there might still be some useful factoids below so bear with us.

And check out the upcoming Part 2, ofcourse.

NR.1 - THE #WANNASURF

So you've recently discovered surfing and have kinda outgrown your NSP, foamie or surftech log.

Or at least you think you have.

You're right. It's time for a summer switch. 

Now would really be the time to get a custom board shaped specially for your size and abilities, it will massively improve your surfing.

But hey, you could still go stock.

You actually have two options.

Two.

Simple, right?

 

OPTION A.  GET EGGED.

 
    Yes indeed. This superflat bottomed ´Paon´ (french for peacock) pintail egg by Bretagne-based shaper Plume d´Avion was made to do one thing: plane over soft peeling walls and swoosh through mush.  7´4. All rails. Trim all day long.  Hanging around our Amsterdam shop  at the moment.

 

Yes indeed. This superflat bottomed ´Paon´ (french for peacock) pintail egg by Bretagne-based shaper Plume d´Avion was made to do one thing: plane over soft peeling walls and swoosh through mush.

7´4. All rails. Trim all day long. Hanging around our Amsterdam shop at the moment.

The traditional 'egg' outline is a kind of parallel, oval shape: just by looking at the board from a distance, you couldn't instantly discern its nose from its tail.

This particular design feature automatically creates a super long rail line. Which means more of your board's 'edge' will be in the water when turning and trimming.This in turn makes for easier, fluid and stable surfing, predictable handling and continuous drive. Just what you want when you're trying to improve your game. Or when waves are less oomphy and your board needs to absord all the push it can.

For instance, a more flat-bottomed egg can give you some real demonic speed on small summer peelers because of its relatively big planing area and drawn out bottom profile. Think effortless turning, hold and speed underneath your back foot, and buttery glide and trim when stepping forward. Carving out grand arcs. Making mushy sections as if you were riding a 9'6.

A good egg will make you surf more steezy, paddles like a dream, turns beautifully and handles almost every wave from ankle-slapper to well overhead. It will automatically put you into a more laidback, summery state of mind.

And if you´re not careful, it will become your new go-to board...

ORDERING TIPS

  • Like the more mellow breaks and spacing out while on a wave? Just get it with a single fin box.
  • Occasional hollower beach break or thicker lip type? Add some side-bite boxes for extra grab & drive.
  • Smaller guys/girls: order your summer egg from 5'10 to 7'4
  • Medium peepz: 6´6 to 7´8
  • Bigger/taller/"really hates paddling" types: 7´0 to 8´4
  • Shapers to order from: Bob Mitsven, Neal Purchase JNR, Beau Young, Josh Hall, Troy Elmore, Larry Mabile, Plume d´Avion
 

OPTION B.  SIMMONs

Simmons? Yeah there once was a guy named Bob Simmons. Back when surfboards were mostly loggy longboards and couldn't turn well, or go fast, or do anything but move pretty slowly down the line really.

Mr. Simmons cleverly married the design principles of your grandpa's fishing sloop and an airplane wing, and (at least partly) invented the basis of every modern surfboard.

A long way of saying: if you surf a simmons or mini-simmons you´ll have a twin-finned shortboard that paddles like a longboard, handles like a big wide skateboard and is super super fast.

A mini-simmons will go anywhere you want it to on any wave up to 3ft,  and will skate over foamy inside sections like its the next best thing. Because of its wide outline, broad tail and thick flat foil, any simmons can be ridden very very short. Depending on how ´turny´ and snappy you want it to be.

It will make any summer session extremely fun, max-out your wave count and ´ll transform your idea of riding a shortboard at the same time.

Try it. We dare you.

Or, let that Hydrodynamica clip convince you.

ORDERING TIPS

A Simmons traditionally comes with twin glassed on keel fins.

If you want to try different fins or use it as a travel board, order one with finboxes. Twin or quad.

Smaller guys/girls: order it from 4'8 to 5'3

Medium peepz: 5´2 to 5´6

Bigger/taller/"really hates paddling" types: 5´6 to 6´0

Simmons shapers: Josh Hall, Larry Mabile, Bob Mitsven, Tyler Warren, Thomas Bexon, Blake Peters (Panda)


Well that´s that for Part 1. We sincerely hope we´ve pointed you in the right direction (or any direction...) and have teased you into trying something new, progress your surfing and ditching that crusty old thruster or 90s ´performance´ longboard. 

There´s a gazillion other board options out there to surf this summer but we strongly believe your quiver and surfing deserve at least one of the above.

 Don´t hesitate to ask us any board-related questions, DM us via the gram or mail us on hello@seasicksurf.com. Or just order a board straight away ofcourse...

 

Have a good one and see you back here next week for Part 2.

 

Stay sick,

the crew.